Ham Radio Geostationary Satellite Transponders

An article by Dan Maloney KC1DJT about the new Es'hail-2 / QO-100 amateur radio geostationary satellite transponders

For the reception, a dish in the 60-cm to 1-meter range will suffice, depending on location, with a decent LNB downconverter. Pretty much any SDR will do for a receiver. An alternative to assembling the hardware yourself — and the only way to get in on the fun for the two-thirds of the planet not covered by the satellite — would be to tune into one of the WebSDR ground stations that have been set up.

The British Amateur Television Club and AMSAT-UK, located at Goonhilly Earth Station, have set up an SDR for the narrowband transponder that you can control over the web. I used it to listen in on a number of contacts between hams the other night.

Media Story - https://hackaday.com/2019/03/18/eshail-2-hams-get-their-first-geosynchronous-repeater/


Bethlehem Receives First Signals From OSCAR 100

Bethlehem Receives First Signals From OSCAR 100

Rickus de Lange, ZS4A in Bethlehem was the first station in South Africa to report having monitor QSOs on Qatar OSCAR 100. Rickus pointed his dish skywards and on the eve of the official inauguration of Es’hailsat on 14 February 2019 monitored QSOs from the geostationary satellite.

Es’hailsat has been one of the major discussions on the agenda of the AMSAT Space Symposiums over the past two years with Hannes Coetzee, ZS6BZP providing details of how to set up an inexpensive ground station.

Read More

Qatar OSCAR-100 Web Receiver Live

Qatar OSCAR-100 Web Receiver Live

The BATC and AMSAT-UK 10 GHz Narrowband WebSDR and Wideband Spectrum Viewer for the amateur transponders on the Es'hail-2 geostationary satellite are now available online

Qatar OSCAR-100 is the first geostationary amateur radio transponder, a joint project between the Qatar Satellite Company (Es'hailSat), the Qatar Amateur Radio Society (QARS), and AMSAT Deutschland (AMSAT-DL) which provided the technical lead.

Read More